In the state of New York, a Class A felony is serious and carries the highest penalties of any felony possible. While being convicted of a felony can be scary, the sentencing of this crime can cause you to be in prison for decades. If you’re facing a felony charge in New York, it’s vital to the outcome of your case that you contact a criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. An experienced and reputable criminal defense lawyer will be able to review your case and even help to reduce your sentence, get your charges dropped, or even beat your case if it goes to trial. The Law Offices of David I. Goldstein is proud to offer more than 40 years of experience in handling criminal defense case in New York. If you’re facing a felony charge, call David I. Goldstein and his associates now!

Class A Felony Explanation

As mentioned above, a Class A felony in New York is the most serious of all convictions and crimes. The two types of crime, felonies and misdemeanors, are divided up into different classes and designations. A felony is the more serious of the two, and a Class A designation is the absolute worst. Further, a Class A felony is divided into two different felonies. A-I and A-II classifications denote different felonies, with A-I being the highest and worst crime possible. Whichever your conviction ends up being, a Class A felony is extremely serious and always prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law by law enforcement, prosecutors, and judges.

Class A Felony Examples

The following are examples of a Class A felony in New York:

  • Aggravated murder
  • Arson in the first degree
  • Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the first degree
  • Kidnapping in the first degree
  • Murder in the first degree
  • Criminal possession of a chemical or biological weapon in the first degree
  • Operating as a major trafficker
  • Crime of terrorism
  • Conspiracy in the first degree

As you can see, all of these crimes are the most serious and abhorrent forms of murder, arson, kidnapping, conspiracy, drug sales, and terrorism. The crimes listed above are all forms of an A-I felony. While an A-II felony is just as serious, it can be a little less serious than an A-I form but will still be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Some examples of an A-II felony include:

  • Predatory sexual assault
  • Predatory sexual assault of a child
  • Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the second degree
  • Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the second degree
  • Criminal use of a chemical weapon or biological weapon in the second degree

All of these crimes have specific requirements that must be proven by a prosecutor before you can be convicted of a Class A felony, obviously because they are so serious in nature and have the potential to completely ruin a person’s life, job opportunities, and social standing. If wrongfully convicted of a Class A felony, a person may experience serious repercussions that will take years to heal. This is why these crimes are carefully analyzed to ensure that there is evidence to support them before a suspect can be convicted of a Class A felony. Also, it’s important to note that just because you were charged with a Class A felony, does not mean that your actions fit the accusations. Because this conviction takes so much time to manifest, your criminal defense lawyer will work hard to get the charges dropped, will challenge the evidence, or get the charges reduced as much as possible.

Punishments for a Class A Felony

Since these are the most serious crimes, the punishments for Class A felonies are also extremely stern. If you’re convicted of a felony and sentenced, your life may end as you know it. It’s important to know that in September of this year, the sentencing laws of New York are set to expire and be reevaluated.

New York uses a form of sentencing called indeterminate sentencing, which means that the law sets maximum and minimum sentences. That means that a judge will sentence you in between this range, but also your personal sentence will have both a maximum and minimum. This means that there is a minimum amount of time that you must stay in prison before you’re eligible for parole, and the maximum is the amount of time that you are required to stay in prison, but they must release you after this amount of time has passed. In the state of New York, the maximum sentence is life without parole (LWOP). The minimum sentence is 25 years.

If you’re facing a felony conviction in New York, contact The Law Offices of David I. Goldstein as soon as possible! Call now!